Society of Legal Scholars

Conference: Law and Food

  • Monday 10th July 2017
  • Lyon, France

For its fifth Annual Conference (10-12 July 2017), Juris Diversitas revisits its culinary origins. The links between law and food are as old as the concept of law. Babylon, Egypt, Greece, and Rome cared about access to water resources and food, whether it came to trade or protection. Since times immemorial, Bhutan makes sure every citizen has access to a minimal acreage of land to secure food for the family. Whilst religions multiplied food prohibitions and prescriptions, customs redistributed land, shared its occupancy in creative ways, or favored communal property so that everyone had access to food. Laws have multiplied to facilitate food trade, security, safety, traceability, and also to promote and protect food and wine production, using trademarks and geographical denominations. In addition, the language of food and cooking offers legal thinkers and teachers mouth-watering metaphors, comparing rules to recipes, and their combination to culinary processes.

Further information at: Juris Diversitas Annual Conference