The Criminalizing Contagion: ethical, legal and clinical has issued a call for papers. Papers must be submitted by Friday December 14 2012.

Joint Call for Papers for Sexually Transmitted Infections, Journal of Medical Ethics and Medical Humanities Criminalizing Contagion: ethical, legal and clinical challenges of prosecuting the spread of disease and sexually transmitted infections The BMJ Group journals Sexually Transmitted Infections (impact factor 3.029), Journal of Medical Ethics (impact factor 1.391) and Medical Humanities, in conjunction with academics at the Centre for Social Ethics and Policy (University of Manchester) and the Health Ethics and Law Network (University of Southampton), would like to publish a collection of articles on the criminalization of disease and sexually transmitted infections. We invite article contributions to be published as part of this themed collection. Themes The use of criminal law to respond to infectious disease transmission has far-reaching implications for law, policy and practice. It presupposes co-operation between clinicians and criminal justice professionals, and that people who infect others can be effectively and fairly identified and brought to justice. There is a potentially difficult relationship between criminal justice and public health bodies, whose priorities do not necessarily coincide. We are interested in receiving papers of broad interest to an international readership of medical ethics scholars and practicing clinicians on any of the following topics: • Legislative and policy reform on disease and sexually transmitted infections • Health services and the police: privacy, state interference and human rights • Evidence and ethics: prosecuting ‘infectious’ personal behaviours • Clinicians and the courts: the role of health professionals and criminal justice • The aims of criminalization and public health: a compatibility problem? • International comparative studies on disease and criminalization: policy, practice and legal issues Publication 1. Up to eight articles will published in a special section in an issue of Sexually Transmitted Infections in 2013. 2. Two articles will be published in a special section in an issue of Journal of Medical Ethics in 2013. 3. Up to two articles will be published in Medical Humanities in 2013. All articles will be blind peer reviewed according to each individual journal’s editorial policies. Final publication decisions will rest with the Editors in Chief: Professor Jackie Cassell (STI), Professor Julian Savulescu (JME) and Professor Deborah Kirklin (MH). Important Dates Please submit your article to one of the journals no later than December 14th 2012. Submission Instructions For Sexually Transmitted Infections: Articles for STI should be a maximum of 2,500 words and submitted via the journal’s website: http://sti.bmj.com/. Please choose the special issue ‘Criminalizing Contagion’ during the submission process. For Journal of Medical Ethics: Articles for JME should be a maximum of 3,500 words, and submitted via the journal’s website: http://jme.bmj.com/. Please choose the special issue ‘Criminalizing Contagion’ during the submission process. For Medical Humanities: Articles for MH should be a maximum of 5,000 words, and submitted via the journal’s website: http://mh.bmj.com/. Please choose the special issue ‘Criminalizing Contagion’ during the submission process. Further submission instructions are on the journals’ respective websites. If you would like to discuss any aspect of your submission, including possible topics and the journals involved, please contact the guest editors in the first instance: Dr David Gurnham (David.Gurnham@manchester.ac.uk), Dr Catherine Stanton (Catherine.Stanton@manchester.ac.uk) or Dr Hannah Quirk (Hannah.Quirk@manchester.ac.uk).


© Copyright The Society of Legal Scholars 2001-2014. PO Box 3017, Bristol BS6 9HJ. The United Kingdom. Email: admin@legalscholars.ac.uk  Registered with the Charity Commission for England and Wales (No: 282719).